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Activity incentive programs

The health benefits of physical activity are numerous, from reduced risk of chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, to better mental health and increased quality of life. In addition, relatively small amounts of activity can lead to significant benefits: just 2.5 hours of moderate-intensity physical activity per week can reduce overall mortality risk by nearly 20%. Research shows that even small incentives can significantly influence individual decisions and behaviors towards physical activity. Incentives that encourage greater levels of physical activity through reimbursement of gym memberships or other means of physical activity can help people develop and maintain regular exercise routines and achieve greater fitness levels.

Part 1: Activity Incentive Programs

A plan with at least 2 of the following is developed and implemented:

a.88 Tax-exempt payroll deductions relating to bicycle commuting and mass transit (such as the Transportation Fringe Benefits in Section 132(f) of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code) or a direct subsidy for an equivalent amount.
b.82 $200 or greater reimbursements or incentive payments in every 6-month period that an employee meets a 50-visit minimum to the gym or professional program.
c. A subsidy of at least $240 per year is available to each interested employee to cover the costs of participation in races, group fitness activities and sports teams.
d. A subsidy of at least $240 per year is available to employees to cover the costs of fitness or training programs offered in professional gyms or studios.
e. A subsidy of at least $50 per year is available to employees to cover the costs of a bicycle share membership.
f. A fitness program in which it is demonstrated that at least 30% of regular building occupants utilize free access to gyms or fitness classes.
Part 2: Sedentary Behavior Reduction

An incentive program in elementary and middle schools is developed with parental support for participation in challenges targeting time spent on at least one of the following:

a.161 TV-viewing.
b.161 Recreational computer or smartphone use.
c.161 Video gaming.
d.161 Other recreational screen-based, sedentary behaviors.
Muscular
Skeletal

Applicability Matrix

Core & Shell New & Existing Buildings New & Existing Interiors
Part 1: Activity Incentive Programs - P P
Commercial Kitchen Education Multifamily Residential Restaurant Retail
Part 1: Activity Incentive Programs - P - P P
Part 2: Sedentary Behavior Reduction - P - - -

Verification Methods Matrix

Letters of Assurance Annotated Documents On-Site Checks
PART 1 (Organizational Protocol)
Activity Incentive Programs
Policy Document
PART 2 (Organizational Protocol)
Sedentary Behavior Reduction
Policy Document
82

Oxford Health Plans. Gym Reimbursement. https://www.oxhp.com/secure/materials/Gym_Reimbursement.pdf . Published 2011. Accessed October 17, 2014.

65.1.b

Certain Oxford health plans allow for reimbursement of a portion of the gym membership fee for each 6-month period wherein the employee meets a 50-visit minimum.

88

U.S. Internal Revenue Service. Internal Revenue Code of 1986 §132(f). Washington, D.C.: Internal Revenue Service; 1986.

65.1.a

IRC Section 132(f) on qualified transportation fringe allows employers to offer employees the opportunity to set aside a portion of their salary to pay for certain transportation expenses.

161

Community Preventive Services Task Force. Obesity Prevention and Control: Behavioral Interventions that Aim to Reduce Recreational Sedentary Screen Time Among Children. http://www.thecommunityguide.org/obesity/behavioral.html. Updated December 4, 2014. Accessed March 29, 2015.

65.2.b

The Task Force recommends interventions that reduce recreational screen time for children 13 years and younger. Recreational screen time can include the use of computers or cell phones for watching TV content, not related to school or work.

65.2.c

The Task Force recommends interventions that reduce recreational screen time for children 13 years and younger, noting that family-based social support with electronic monitoring targeting time spent on activies such as videogame use was highly effective.

65.2.d

The Task Force recommends interventions that reduce recreational screen time for children 13 years and younger. Recreational, sedentary screen time includes screen time that is neither school-related nor work-related.

65.2.a

The Task Force recommends interventions that reduce recreational screen time for children 13 years and younger. Recreational screen time can include the use of computers or cell phones for watching TV content, not related to school or work.