This is a legacy version of the WELL Building Standard. Please check the latest version here.

Periodic water quality testing

Changing industrial practices and temporal variations in temperature, pH and weather may affect the leaching rate of inorganic metals into drinking water sources. Where possible, routine testing can help to detect any large variations in the chemicals present in water and help alert building occupants if a building is inconsistently receiving high quality water.

Part 1: Quarterly Testing

All water being delivered to the project area for human consumption is tested quarterly (with reports submitted annually to the IWBI) for the presence of the following dissolved metals or metalloids:

a.53 Lead.
b.53 Arsenic.
c.53 Mercury.
d.53 Copper.
Part 2: Water Data Record Keeping and Response

Projects provide a written policy specifying:

a. Detailed enforcement strategies for monitoring and keeping record of water quality parameters listed in the WELL Building Standard.
b. Records are kept for a minimum of 3 years, including full data from field inspections or laboratory results where appropriate.
c. A detailed plan for action and remediation of unacceptable conditions.
Nervous
Immune
Digestive
Urinary

Applicability Matrix

Core & Shell New & Existing Buildings New & Existing Interiors
Part 1: Quarterly Testing - O O
Part 2: Water Data Record Keeping and Response - O O
Commercial Kitchen Education Multifamily Residential Restaurant Retail
Part 1: Quarterly Testing O O O O O
Part 2: Water Data Record Keeping and Response O O O O O

Verification Methods Matrix

Letters of Assurance Annotated Documents On-Site Checks
Part 1: Quarterly Testing Operations Schedule
Part 2: Water Data Record Keeping and Response Operations Schedule
53

World Health Organization. Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality Fourth Edition. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2011: 26, 371, 383, 416, 433.

35.1.d

The WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, Fourth Edition notes that some hazards "may arise intermittently, often associated with seasonal activity or seasonal conditions."

35.1.a

The WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, Fourth Edition notes that some hazards "may arise intermittently, often associated with seasonal activity or seasonal conditions."

35.1.b

The WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, Fourth Edition notes that some hazards "may arise intermittently, often associated with seasonal activity or seasonal conditions."

35.1.c

The WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, Fourth Edition notes that some hazards "may arise intermittently, often associated with seasonal activity or seasonal conditions."