This is a legacy version of the WELL Building Standard. Please check the latest version here.

Exterior active design

Greater land-use mix has been linked to higher physical activity levels and lower rates of obesity. In addition, the presence of retail shops, bus stops and offices within walking distance from residences is linked to a higher likelihood of walking and using transit. Similarly, integrating elements of active design into the building and site, and creating cyclist and pedestrian-friendly environments around the building can help incentivize physical activity. Providing facilities such as benches, drinking fountains and water bottle refilling stations along a building’s walking routes can help support occupant activity throughout the day. Incorporating active design principles is particularly important for projects that are isolated from urban centers where automobile transportation predominates.

Part 1: Pedestrian Amenities

Sites in which the building takes up less than 75% of the total lot size provide at least one of the following within highly-trafficked areas, such as building entrances, public transportation stops, walking paths and plazas:

a.87 A bench.
b.87 A cluster of movable chairs and tables.
c.87 A drinking fountain or water refilling station.
Part 2: Pedestrian Promotion

To encourage more pedestrian activity, sites in which the building takes up less than 75% of the total lot size include at least two of the following in the outdoors:

a.87 A water fountain or other water feature.
b.87 A plaza or open air courtyard.
c. A garden or other landscaped elements.
d.87 Public art.
Part 3: Neighborhood Connectivity

To encourage neighborhood connectivity and daily activity, at least one of the following requirements is met:

a.86 The building address has a Walk Score® of 70 or greater.
b.1 At least four existing and publicly available diverse uses (listed in LEED BD+C: Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses, Appendix 1) are present within 800 m [0.5 mi] of the main building entrance.
Muscular
Respiratory
Cardiovascular
Skeletal
Nervous

Applicability Matrix

Core & Shell New & Existing Buildings New & Existing Interiors
Part 1: Pedestrian Amenities O O O
Part 2: Pedestrian Promotion O O O
Part 3: Neighborhood Connectivity O O O
Commercial Kitchen Education Multifamily Residential Restaurant Retail
Part 1: Pedestrian Amenities - O O O O
Part 2: Pedestrian Promotion - O O O O
Part 3: Neighborhood Connectivity - O O O O

Verification Methods Matrix

Letters of Assurance Annotated Documents On-Site Checks
Part 1: Pedestrian Amenities Owner Spot Check
Part 2: Pedestrian Promotion Owner Spot Check
Part 3: Neighborhood Connectivity Annotated Map
1

U.S. Green Building Council. LEED v4: Reference Guide for Building Design and Construction. Washington D.C.: U.S. Green Building Council; 2013: 37, 43-44, 541-552, 567, 605, 623, 645-53, 658-61, 682-3, 685-6, 723-4.

67.3.b

USGBC's LEED v4 LT credit: Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses is intended to "promote walkability, and transportation efficiency and reduce vehicle distance traveled" and "improve public health by encouraging daily physical activity".

86

Walk Score. Walk Score Methodology. http://www.walkscore.com/methodology.shtml . Published 2014. Accessed October 17, 2014.

67.3.a

Walk Score’s City and Neighborhood Ranking identifies that a Walk Score® of 70 or greater is one that allows most errands to be accomplished on foot.

87

New York City Departments of Design and Construction, Health and Mental Hygiene, Transportation, City Planning. Active Design Guidelines: Promoting Physical Activity and Health in Design. Published 2010: 4-7; 34; 43; 72-76; 85-87.

67.1.a

NYC Active Design Guidelines identifies the design of pedestrian-friendly streets with a number of features, including benches, as a key recommended measure to encourage active environments.

67.1.b

NYC Active Design Guidelines recommends strategies for creating pedestrian and bicycle-friendly public spaces, including the provision of both movable and fixed seating.

67.1.c

NYC Active Design Guidelines recommends strategies for increasing walking, including the provision of supportive infrastructure along walking routes, such as drinking fountains and water refilling stations.

67.2.d

NYC Active Design Guidelines: Promoting Physical Activity and Health in Design recommends incorporating temporary and permanent public art installations into the streetscape to provide a more attractive and engaging environment.

67.2.b

NYC Active Design Guidelines: Promoting Physical Activity and Health in Design recommends strategies for creating attractive plaza spaces.

67.2.a

NYC Active Design Guidelines recommends strategies for creating pedestrian and bicycle-friendly public spaces, including the provision of water fountains.