Safe food preparation materials

Safe food preparation materials

Intent: 

To reduce occupant exposure to harmful contaminants that may originate from food preparation materials and eliminate surfaces that harbor pathogens.

BACKGROUND

Food preparation equipment can be a source of potentially hazardous contaminants. Porous surfaces can harbor harmful toxins, while chemicals used to impart special attributes to food preparation equipment, such as non-stick properties for cookware, can leach or volatize during use. One such contaminant is bisphenol-A (BPA), a phenolic-based chemical that is used in products ranging from baby bottles and plastic foodware to water bottles and food can linings. While generally stable, BPA can be released when products containing BPA are exposed to heat or UV light, and may have negative effects on human health.

Part 1
Cooking Material

Pots, pans, dishware and other cooking tools used to prepare food (except cutting boards) are made entirely of one or more of the following inert materials:
a.67
Ceramics, except those containing lead.
b.67
Cast iron.
c.67
Stainless steel.
d.67
Glass.
e.67
Coated aluminum.
f.
Solid (non-laminated) wood that is untreated or treated with food-grade mineral or linseed oil.

Part 2
Cutting Surfaces

All cutting boards are made from the following materials, and are replaced when they become excessively worn or have deep grooves from cutting:
a.75
Marble.
b.75
Plastic.
c.75
Glass.
d.75
Pyroceramic.
e.75
Solid (non-laminated) wood that is untreated or treated with food-grade mineral or linseed oil.

Part 3
Banned Plastics

No serving containers or plates are made from the following materials:
a.121
Plastic Number 6 (polystyrene).
b.
Plastic Number 7 (miscellaneous).

Part 4
Containers for Prepared Food

The following materials will be used for all containers used to store, or package food ingredients or prepared foods:
a.
Paper or recycled paper.
b.
Glass.
c.
Aluminum.
d.
NSF certified stainless steel.
e.
Ceramics, except those containing lead.