This is a legacy version of the WELL Building Standard. Please check the latest version here.

Radiant thermal comfort

New technology surrounding radiant temperature systems has led to recent advances making the systems more energy efficient. Additional benefits include saved floor space, lower dust transportation and increased thermal comfort through the separation of temperature controls and outdoor air supply systems. In addition, with the use of radiant heating, the mean radiant temperature in a space can be kept lower compared to convective heating, providing the benefit of a slightly higher relative humidity in winter time.

Part 1: Lobbies and Other Common Spaces

All lobbies and other common spaces meet the requirements set forth in ASHRAE Standard 55-2013 for thermal comfort through the use of one of the following systems:

a. Hydronic radiant heating and/or cooling systems.
b. Electric radiant systems.
Part 2: Offices and Other Regularly Occupied Spaces

At least 50% of the floor area in all offices and other regularly occupied spaces meets the requirements set forth in ASHRAE Standard 55-2013 for thermal comfort through the use of one of the following systems:

a.93 Hydronic radiant heating and/or cooling systems.
b.93 Electric radiant systems.
Nervous
Immune
Respiratory
Integumentary

Applicability Matrix

Core & Shell New & Existing Buildings New & Existing Interiors
Part 1: Lobbies and Other Common Spaces O O -
Part 2: Offices and Other Regularly Occupied Spaces - O O
Commercial Kitchen Education Multifamily Residential Restaurant Retail
Part 1: Lobbies and Other Common Spaces - O O O -
Part 2: Offices and Other Regularly Occupied Spaces - O - O -

Verification Methods Matrix

Letters of Assurance Annotated Documents On-Site Checks
PART 1 (Design)
Lobbies and Other Common Spaces
MEP
PART 2 (Design)
Offices and Other Regularly Occupied Spaces
MEP
93

U.S. Department of Energy. Radiant Heating. http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/radiant-heating. Published 2012. Accessed September 15, 2014.

83.1.a

The Department of Energy identifies radiant heating systems as more effiicient and less likely to distribute allergens than forced-air systems.

83.1.b

The Department of Energy identifies radiant heating systems as more effiicient and less likely to distribute allergens than forced-air systems.

83.2.b

The Department of Energy identifies radiant heating systems as more effiicient and less likely to distribute allergens than forced-air systems.

83.2.a

The Department of Energy recommends radiant heating systems over forced-air systems as they are usually more efficient and do not distribute allergens.