Ergonomics: visual and physical

Ergonomics: visual and physical

Intent: 

To reduce physical strain and maximize ergonomic comfort and safety.

In general, no. The definition of "workstation" does not include furniture in conference rooms or other breakout spaces. Project teams who wish to consider conference room furnishings or other breakout furnishings towards feature requirements may do so but must apply a consistent definition of "workstation" throughout their project. For example, if a project team uses a sit-stand workstation located in a conference room or breakout space towards Feature 73 (and/or Feature 71), they must also consider it a workstation for the purposes of Feature 54 and other features that refer to "workstations.

The owner must provide compliant workstations throughout the entire building, including all tenant spaces. Access to tenant spaces is required to conduct a spot check during Performance Verification.

Storage/cabinetry with a flat work surface is not considered a proper standing desk. To be considered a proper standing desk or workstation, furnishings must be primarily used for work and should have enough recessed space beneath them that occupants can stand comfortably at the workstation.

If standing desks are also are characterized as "workstations" to comply with Feature 73 (and/or Feature 71), they are also considered workstations for the purposes of Feature 53, Feature 54, Feature and Feature 57.

No, this does not include furniture that is in the conference rooms or breakout rooms.

No, laptops do not inherently meet the part 1 Visual Ergonomics requirements. While laptops are easily moved closer or further from a user they are not vertically adjustable. Therefore, projects would need to provide furnishings/accessories that allow occupants to raise and lower their laptop to fit the user's needs.
Due to amendments made to Feature 73 language in the Q1 2018 Addenda, projects registered under earlier versions of the standard (prior to Q1 2018), can consider laptops as inherently compliant with the Part 1 requirements without the need for additional furnishings/accessories. Please reach out to your coaching contact for more information.

Yes. However, note that projects must consistently apply definitions to their spaces across all features. Thus, if standing desks are also are characterized as "workstations" to comply with Feature 73 (and/or Feature 71), they are also considered workstations for the purposes of Feature 54 and other features that refer to "workstations."

Please refer to the published AAP for details on how a project may provide a lower threshold of the required initial percentage of sit/stand workstations in conjunction with a future purchase commitment and an educational campaign.

Yes, there is flexibility in terms of the types of equipment that can be used to make a computer screen height-adjustable.

This feature requires that chairs meet either the HFES 100 standard or the BIFMA G1 guidelines for seat height and depth. The HFES 100 standard states the chair height must be adjustable over a range of 11.4 cm (4.5 in), between 38 to 56 cm (15 - 22 in). The BIFMA G1 guidelines state the chair height must be adjustable between (at least) the range of 37.5 cm to 51.2 cm (14.8 to 20.2 in). HFES 100 states the chair seat depth can either be adjustable or fixed, but must be include a depth of 43 cm (16.9 in). BIFMA G1 Guidelines state the chair seat depth can either be adjustable or fixed, but should include a depth of 41.5 cm (16.4 in) or less. The majority of chair specification sheets will provide this information.